Honda learning how to loan Accord EV batteries to the grid

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Quick Take: I continue to think that Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) is a bad idea. Why go to the expense of installing a bi-directional charger and why degrade a car's battery with additional discharge cycles when you can get almost the same benefit by smart charging? Under V2G, a utility can suck power from EV batteries when needed. Under smart charging, a utility decides when and how fast to recharge an EV's battery. It can then use that slack to, for instance, follow wind at night as it ramps up and down.

 

But plenty of smart people think I'm wrong, including  the University of Delaware and NRG Energy. In early 2013, they launched a V2G pilot complete with hardware, software, controls, regulatory requirements, and market participation rules for selling energy EV batteries into the PJM Interconnection Regulation Market.

 

Now Honda is joining the pack. It is supplying an Accord Plug-In Hybrid with added V2G capabilities including a bi-directional on-board charger. That charger lets the EV both charge from and discharge to the electrical grid. - By Jesse Berst

Honda Joins Vehicle-to-Grid Technology Demonstration Project in Partnership with University of Delaware and NRG Energy

 

December 5, 2013 – Honda has joined a demonstration project for experimental vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology aimed at providing a potentially valuable energy storage resource to the nation's electrical grid while providing for more cost-effective ownership of plug-in electric vehicles.

 

The Honda technology builds off of the research conducted by the University of Delaware and now supported by NRG Energy, Inc.  NRG and the University of Delaware, through their eV2g joint venture, came online early in 2013 with the world's first revenue-generating vehicle-to-grid project, demonstrating the controls, regulatory requirements, and market participation rules for selling energy storage from vehicles into the PJM Interconnection Regulation Market. Honda is supplying an Accord Plug-In Hybrid with added V2G capabilities to the University's Science, Technology and Advanced Research (STAR) Campus to jointly investigate the potential of this technology to benefit the electrical grid, vehicle owners and society.

 

Using smart grid technology, the V2G system is able to monitor the status of the grid to determine whether the grid requires additional power sources that can respond rapidly, or the grid requires power demands that can absorb transitional power supply. Such a system has the potential to reduce or eliminate the fluctuation of the grid, which can occur more frequently when renewable energy sources are introduced to the grid. Electric vehicle owners potentially benefit from supporting a more stable power grid, which can lead to reduced utility costs for the vehicle owner.